Hawaii Travel Restrictions Might Not Outlast the Winter
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  • Post published:10/02/2022
  • Post last modified:10/02/2022

Hawaiian authorities are now suggesting that all the state’s COVID-19 travel restrictions could soon end. According to Lt. Gov. Josh Green, the change might happen by spring.

Gov. David Ige, meanwhile, has stated that the state’s Safe Travels program will not add booster shots to the list of visitor requirements.

Previously, he’d indicated that booster shots might become necessary, but that was amid a surge in cases thanks to the omicron variant. At the time, hospitalizations were rising precipitously.

However, hospitalizations went down before the change could be implemented.

The impending end of restrictions is, of course, dependent on what the virus does. Green noted that restrictions would have ended much earlier if not for omicron, the most contagious variant so far.

Currently, U.S. visitors to Hawaii have to provide either a negative test or proof of complete vaccination if they want to skip the state’s five-day self-quarantine upon arrival.

Americans heading to Hawaii from foreign nations have to follow the same rules as everyone entering the U.S. They must offer proof of full vaccination and a negative test taken within 24 hours before heading to Hawaii.

During the state’s omicron peak, there were almost 60,000 cases and over 400 hospitalizations.

Those numbers have dropped significantly as of Feb. 9. Additionally, over 75% of the state’s residents are fully vaccinated, and over 36% are boosted.

The mayor of Maui has responded to these encouraging numbers by removing the island’s booster requirement for entering restaurants and other recreational spaces.

Lowered restrictions will be welcome news for remote workers who love to travel. Though the pandemic has caused immeasurable trouble worldwide, it allowed many people to discover that they love working from home.

Without COVID-19 restrictions, remote employees can use their professional flexibility to travel where they please, and Hawaii’s economy could benefit from their tourism.

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